Starting My Garden: Planting Seeds in Repurposed Egg Carton

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by on February 27, 2012

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zucchini-sproutThe first sprouts of our Zucchini – aren’t they cute?

I am so excited to finally get my garden started this season! I know it is still a tad early for plants outside, since we may have a few more cold spells, but it is perfect timing to plant seeds in doors.  This will be my 3rd garden ( I took last year off since I was due in May with my baby girl) and I’m so looking forward to the fresh vegetables and herbs we will be growing!

New to Gardening?

If you are new to planting, or think that a garden isn’t for you, I encourage you to start one! Even if you just try container gardening, or a few of your favorite herbs, I know you will enjoy the fruits of your labor (literally!) once you taste that first fresh tomato, strawberry, or make homemade sauce with fresh basil. There is nothing like a fresh veggie grown with love from your own garden.

Plus, gardening is a great learning tool for kids. My son is just as excited to start the garden this year as I am – and if you are wondering what plants to start with, you can check out this post on 3 Easy Garden Plants for Kids.

Planting Your Seeds

garden-seed-supplies3 essentials: container, organic seeds, and organic potting soil

1. Pick your seeds. If you aren’t sure what you want to plant (or when), you can check out Sprout Robot, which allows you to put in your zip code and then get a “gardening calendar” on what to plant. It will give you some ideas of what you may want to include. I recommend getting organic seeds, and you can pick them up at a local nursery, Home Depot or Lowe’s, or even check a local farmer’s market.

2. Gather your materials – The nice part about planting seeds indoors is that you don’t need much to get them going. You’ll need seeds , soil, and a container to plant them in.  Save on the cost to start your garden by repurposing an egg carton as your container. You can use a cardboard egg carton and once they are ready to be planted outdoors, you can plant the entire container. (You can also buy biodegradable containers at your local gardening center).

I used a plastic egg carton to create a “mini greenhouse” for my seeds – I really was curious if it would help it grow the seeds faster. And it did! Less than a week after planting, my zucchini started to sprout!

jalapeno-seedsWish these seeds luck!

3. Plant, water, and sun. Planting is easy – and again this is an easy way to get your kids involved in the garden. My 6-year old son actually did all the planting here. He filled each little “pot” with soil, placed in a couple seeds, filled the rest with soil and then watered. It was also his job to water when needed.

watering-canKeep your soil damp – not overwatered. Don’t want to drown your seedlings.

You can keep your seeds indoors by a window, just make sure they are getting sunlight. Since our daytime temperatures are in the 70s right now, it is perfect to leave our seeds outside during the day. I have been bringing them inside once the sun goes down, so they don’t get cold.

You also don’t want to over water. Just check your seeds each day to make sure they are moist. Check the back of the seed packet for how long it should take before you start to see your first sprout. Believe me, it is so fun to finally see that first sprout!

seedling

What I planted:

So far, I planted zucchini, basil, jalapenos, watermelon, and pumpkin. I also plan on planting carrots, onions, garlic, tomatoes, cilantro, and any another herb I think I can grow!

Another change this year is that I plan to try a raised garden bed, so you can expect tips on how to build this – or what challenges I faced – coming soon!

I’d love to hear about how gardening in going.
Have you planted seeds yet this season?
What do you plan to plant?
If you haven’t started a garden yet, what is stopping you?

More Gardening Resources:

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  • Marissa

    I can wait to hear about what else you are going to post with gardening tips! I started one last year. I only have a balcony so all mine are in pots but I have found I can grow most things in them, whether or not they survive is a completely different story haha! I have found that my peppers made it the entire year. I have about 8 different kinds. They don’t need much work or attention. However, this season I want to have more herbs. I had several last year but they didn’t survive the summer because it was so hot, but I enjoyed having them for cooking. I always harvest them as well, and would save them by freezing the herbs in ice cubes. Maybe since you live in the southwest you will have some tips on how my herbs can survive the heat. Good luck with your garden!

  • Marissa

    I can wait to hear about what else you are going to post with gardening tips! I started one last year. I only have a balcony so all mine are in pots but I have found I can grow most things in them, whether or not they survive is a completely different story haha! I have found that my peppers made it the entire year. I have about 8 different kinds. They don’t need much work or attention. However, this season I want to have more herbs. I had several last year but they didn’t survive the summer because it was so hot, but I enjoyed having them for cooking. I always harvest them as well, and would save them by freezing the herbs in ice cubes. Maybe since you live in the southwest you will have some tips on how my herbs can survive the heat. Good luck with your garden!

  • http://www.savingcentswithsense.net/ Melissa Hurst

    Thanks for sharing, Marissa! I have found that Basil is really hardy in the heat. It has been hit or miss with my cilantro – but I know he does well in AZ, so I’m determined to have a good crop going this year. Remember that if your herbs are in pots, you can bring them in during the really hot days – maybe that will help. Have you tried tomatoes? Cherry tomatoes are pretty hardy, too :) Good luck – and keep me informed! I’ll have a new garden update each week.

  • http://www.savingcentswithsense.net/ Melissa Hurst

    Thanks for sharing, Marissa! I have found that Basil is really hardy in the heat. It has been hit or miss with my cilantro – but I know he does well in AZ, so I’m determined to have a good crop going this year. Remember that if your herbs are in pots, you can bring them in during the really hot days – maybe that will help. Have you tried tomatoes? Cherry tomatoes are pretty hardy, too :) Good luck – and keep me informed! I’ll have a new garden update each week.

  • Pingback: How to Build a Raised Bed Vegetable Garden

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